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Some Outcomes Worse for Black Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Ten-year cumulative incidence of disease progression, receipt of definitive treatment increased

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) — African-American men with low-risk prostate cancer have a significantly increased 10-year cumulative incidence of disease progression and definitive treatment than non-Hispanic White men, according to a study published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Rishi Deka, Ph.D., from the VHA San Diego Health Care System in La Jolla, and colleagues compared clinical outcomes of African-American and non-Hispanic White men with low-risk prostate cancer managed with active surveillance in a retrospective cohort study. Data were included for 8,726 men, including 2,280 African-American men and 6,446 non-Hispanic White men, with a median follow-up of 7.6 years.

The researchers found that the 10-year cumulative incidence of disease progression was 59.9 versus 48.3 percent for African-American and non-Hispanic White men (P < 0.001), respectively, while receipt of definitive treatment was 54.8 and 41.4 percent, respectively. There was no significant difference noted for African-American and non-Hispanic White men in regards to metastasis (1.5 versus 1.4 percent), prostate cancer-specific mortality (1.1 versus 1.0 percent), and all-cause mortality (22.4 versus 23.5 percent).

“In contrast to the pathologic end points, the present study did not find any significantly increased risk of metastases, prostate cancer-specific mortality, or all-cause mortality in African American men,” the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the medical technology and biopharmaceutical industries.

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