Home News Heart Health and Cardiology News American College of Cardiology, May 15-17

American College of Cardiology, May 15-17

The American College of Cardiology 70th Annual Scientific Session and Expo

The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held virtually this year from May 15 to 17 and attracted participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in cardiology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the treatment, management, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases, with presentations focusing on novel drugs and surgical approaches to improve the quality of care for patients with cardiovascular diseases.

In one study, Varayini Pankayatselvan, M.D., of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues found that the rate of influenza vaccination in those diagnosed with cardiovascular disease is low.

The authors analyzed adults with a reported diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and their response to an up-to-date influenza vaccination using data from the 2018 to 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of the 21 million Americans with cardiovascular disease, the researchers found that only 50 percent reported an up-to-date influenza vaccination, despite its proven benefit in preventing morbidity and mortality. In addition, the rates were particularly low in Black and Hispanic people compared with White people.

“This study shows on a national level that underserved minorities have particularly low rates, illuminating further racial disparities in health care,” Pankayatselvan said. “To improve vaccination rates, clinicians should not only routinely encourage vaccination at office visits but determine any barriers to vaccination. Additionally, as cardiologists often see patients multiple times a year, they have a wonderful opportunity to start offering vaccination at the office visit itself.”

Press Release

In another study, Schuyler Jones, M.D., of the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, and colleagues found that individuals with established heart disease should remain on aspirin as long as there are no contraindications or other reasons not to be taking the drug.

The authors conducted a large pragmatic clinical trial that compared the effectiveness of two different daily doses (81 mg or 325 mg) of aspirin widely used to prevent heart attacks and strokes in individuals living with heart disease. At 40 health systems, 15,076 participants with established cardiovascular disease were enrolled over three years. The researchers observed no differences in rates of death, hospitalization for a heart attack or stroke, and bleeding between participants who took 81 mg and those who took 325 mg.

“If you are on 81 mg now, staying (rather than switching to 325 mg) is probably right since no differences were found between the two doses. If you are resuming aspirin, starting a lower dose (81 mg) is probably right due to better tolerability and no conclusive evidence that a higher dose is better,” Jones said. “If you are on 325 mg now and doing OK, staying on it may be fine and patients should speak with their clinician about this choice.”

Press Release

Robert Rosenson, M.D., of the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, and colleagues found that patients with severe elevations in triglycerides (>500 mg/dL) who have been hospitalized for acute pancreatitis remain at high risk for recurrent acute pancreatitis despite treatment with diet and multiple triglyceride-lowering medications.

In a phase II placebo-controlled study, the authors evaluated 51 patients across 17 sites in four countries in North America and Europe. The patients were without familial hypercholesterolemia, but did have a history of elevated triglyceride levels (>1,000 mg/dL) and a previous hospitalization for acute pancreatitis. The researchers found that evinacumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody, directed against angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3; an inhibitor of key enzymes involved in triglyceride metabolism) lowered triglycerides markedly in patients with multifactorial chylomicronemia syndrome (one abnormal trait or no detectable defect in lipoprotein lipase or related pathways).

“It did not work in patients with two defects in lipoprotein lipase, which is expected, as disinhibiting a pathway with no or negligible lipoprotein lipase would not be expected to work,” Rosenson said. “This therapy affords the opportunity to lower triglycerides and potentially prevent recurrent acute pancreatitis. Thus, evinacumab addresses an important unmet need.”

The study was funded by Regeneron, the manufacturer of evinacumab.

Press Release

Travis Milan Skipina, M.D., of Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and colleagues found that secondhand smoke is associated with increased odds of heart failure after controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

The authors performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, with secondhand smoke exposure defined based on serum cotinine levels among self-reported nonsmokers and heart failure defined by self-report and an affirmative answer to the question: “Has a physician ever told you that you have congestive heart failure?” Using multivariable logistic regression to compute odds ratios, the researchers found that secondhand smoke was tied to an increased risk of heart failure.

“This study underscores the harmful effects of secondhand smoke on the cardiovascular system and necessitates a personalized risk assessment among those who are at increased risk of these effects,” Skipina said. “Namely, these are people who live in low-income countries or communities with less stringent public health policies.”

Press Release

ACC: Tailored Rehab Beneficial for Heart Failure in Seniors

TUESDAY, May 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) — For older patients with decompensated heart failure, a tailored rehabilitation intervention results in greater improvement in physical function than usual care, according to a study published online May 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Ultrasound Renal Denervation Cuts BP in Med-Resistant HTN

MONDAY, May 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Ultrasound renal denervation reduces blood pressure compared with a sham procedure among patients with hypertension resistant to a standardized triple combination pill, according to a study published online May 16 in The Lancet to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Fish Oil Does Not Improve Outcomes for Those at High CV Risk

MONDAY, May 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) — High levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, are no benefit to patients at high risk for cardiovascular events, according to a study published online May 16 in JAMA Cardiology to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Only Half of Cardiovascular Disease Patients Receive Flu Vaccine

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Only half of the U.S. population with cardiovascular disease report being up to date on influenza vaccination, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Less Than Six Hours of Sleep Tied to Higher Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) — People who regularly sleep six to seven hours a night have lower cardiovascular risk compared with those who sleep less, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: 81-mg, 325-mg Aspirin Similarly Effective in ASCVD

MONDAY, May 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) — For patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, there is no significant difference in cardiovascular events or major bleeding for those receiving 81 mg or 325 mg of aspirin daily, according to a study published online May 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Occlusion of Left Atrial Appendage Prevents Stroke in A-Fib

MONDAY, May 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) — For patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons, occlusion of the left atrial appendage during surgery is associated with a reduction in stroke or systemic embolism, according to a study published online May 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Common Medications Can Raise Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, May 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Nearly one in five adults with hypertension reports taking medications associated with raising blood pressure levels, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Cardiovascular Risk Factors Present in Younger Black Women

FRIDAY, May 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Young Black women show a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Prediabetes May Raise Risk for Major Adverse CV Events

THURSDAY, May 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Prediabetes appears to be a risk factor for increased incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

ACC: Neighborhood Tied to Death Risk After Surviving a Heart Attack

THURSDAY, May 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Neighborhood disadvantage is independently associated with increased mortality after myocardial infarction, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held virtually from May 15 to 17.

Read Full Text

Copyright © 2021 HealthDay. All rights reserved.