Home News September 2019 Briefing – Pain Management

September 2019 Briefing – Pain Management

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pain Management for September 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Average Annual Premium for Workers Increased in 2019

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In 2019, the average annual health insurance premium for workers increased slightly for single coverage and family coverage, according to a report published online Sept. 25 in Health Affairs.

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Many Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Use Opioids

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are more likely to use opioids than persons without SLE, and most SLE patients who use opioids do so for more than one year, according to research published in the Sept. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mortality Persist in the U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — There are still racial and ethnic disparities in mortality, and these disparities are widening for some age groups, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Protected Health Info Breaches Compromise Sensitive Data

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Most protected health information (PHI) breaches compromise sensitive demographic and/or financial information, according to a research letter published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Rate of Opioid Rx Increasing for Incisional Ocular Surgery

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The rate of filled opioid prescriptions is increasing for all types of incisional ocular surgery, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Marijuana Use Common Among Adults With Medical Conditions

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Marijuana use is common among adults with medical conditions, especially younger people, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in JAMA Network Open.

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Medical Students Not Ready to Provide Nutritional Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Medical education does not equip students to provide high-quality, effective nutrition care, according to a review published in the September issue of The Lancet Planetary Health.

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Editorial

Patients With Rheumatic Disease Often Have Trouble Accessing Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Americans with rheumatic disease struggle to access affordable specialty care, according to a national patient survey released by the American College of Rheumatology in conjunction with Rheumatic Disease Awareness Month.

2019 Rheumatic Disease Patient Survey

Purdue Files for Bankruptcy Over Opioid Crisis Suits

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, touching off what could be a fierce battle by dozens of states hoping to recoup billions spent fighting the opioid crisis.

The New York Times Article

Acetaminophen in Pregnancy May Affect Childhood Behavior

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Acetaminophen use in mid-to-late pregnancy may have an adverse effect on early childhood neurocognitive outcome, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.

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Continued Use Low Three Months After ED Opioid Rx for Acute Pain

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Opioid use at three months after an emergency department visit where opioids were prescribed for acute pain is relatively low and not necessarily tied to opioid misuse, according to a study published in the August issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Patient Factors May Predict Opioid Use After Discharge

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Certain factors may help clinicians identify which patients are more likely to have greater opioid use in the first month after major surgery, according to a study published online Aug. 5 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Screening for Opioid-Related Low Testosterone Underused

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — More men with long-term opioid use are screened for low testosterone than men taking opioids for a short period of time; however, given the known link between opioid use and low testosterone, these rates were still lower than expected, according to a study published in the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality & Outcomes.

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EPA to Phase Out Chemical Testing on Mammals

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The eventual elimination of chemical testing on mammals was announced Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The New York Times Article

More Information: EPA

Risk for Long-Term Opioid Use Up in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) have an increased risk for long-term opioid use, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Purdue Pharma Tentatively Reaches Settlement in Opioid Lawsuits

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma has reached a tentative settlement with a coalition of states and local governments that sued the company over its role in America’s ongoing opioid crisis, press reports say.

The New York Times Article

The Washington Post Article

Poverty Rate Drops, but Fewer Americans Have Health Insurance

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The percentage of Americans living in poverty declined in 2018, but the rate of those without health insurance increased, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report.

The New York Times Article

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Opioid Maker Purdue Pharma Expected to File for Bankruptcy

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Settlement talks with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma over its role in the U.S. opioid crisis have reached a stalemate and the company is expected to file for bankruptcy, according to state attorneys general involved in the negotiations.

AP News Article

Use of Pain Reliever Tramadol May Up Risk for Hypoglycemia

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Use of the widely prescribed opioid tramadol is associated with a greater risk for developing hypoglycemia compared with almost every other opioid, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Scientific Reports.

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Racial, Ethnic Underrepresentation Found in Med School Matriculants

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Among medical school matriculants, black, Hispanic, and American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) students are underrepresented, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Network Open.

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Editorial

Majority of U.S. Doctors Believe ACA Has Improved Access to Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Sixty percent of U.S. physicians believe that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has improved access to care and insurance after five years of implementation, according to a report published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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White House Announces Nearly $2 Billion in Grants to Fight Opioid Epidemic

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Nearly $2 billion in grants to help fight the U.S. opioid epidemic will be handed out to states and local governments, the White House says.

AP News Article

Cesarean Section Quality Initiative Cuts Opioid Use

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program, a quality improvement initiative that made changes to preoperative and postoperative processes, leads to reductions in opioid use without increased pain and with faster recovery, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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