Home News General Health News September 2019 Briefing – Critical Care

September 2019 Briefing – Critical Care

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for September 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Crude Incidence of Candidemia 8.7 Per 100,000 in 2012 to 2016

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The crude incidence of candidemia was 8.7 per 100,000 population across four states in 2012 to 2016, according to a surveillance summary published in the Sept. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Infectious Disease Consultation May Lower Candida Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Mortality is lower for patients with candida bloodstream infection receiving an infectious disease consultation, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Average Annual Premium for Workers Increased in 2019

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In 2019, the average annual health insurance premium for workers increased slightly for single coverage and family coverage, according to a report published online Sept. 25 in Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mortality Persist in the U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — There are still racial and ethnic disparities in mortality, and these disparities are widening for some age groups, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Percentage of Women in Internal Med Residencies Increasing

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — From 1999 to 2016, the percentage of women in internal medicine residencies increased, but the percentage in subspecialty fellowships decreased, according to a research letter published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Protected Health Info Breaches Compromise Sensitive Data

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Most protected health information (PHI) breaches compromise sensitive demographic and/or financial information, according to a research letter published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Rise to 530 Across 38 States

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The number of confirmed or suspected severe lung illnesses linked to vaping has risen to 530 cases across 38 states and the Virgin Islands, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

More Information

Few Trauma Patients Assessed for Effects of PTSD, Acute Stress

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Few trauma patients are assessed for or educated about the potential effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or acute stress disorder (ASD), according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Journal of Trauma Nursing.

Abstract/Full Text

Medical Students Not Ready to Provide Nutritional Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Medical education does not equip students to provide high-quality, effective nutrition care, according to a review published in the September issue of The Lancet Planetary Health.

Abstract/Full Text

Editorial

Initiating Empirical Tx for Sepsis Reduces Blood Culture Sensitivity

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — When empirical antimicrobial therapy is initiated in patients with severe manifestations of sepsis, the sensitivity of blood cultures drawn shortly after treatment initiation is reduced, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — U.S. health officials have revised downward the number of cases of severe lung injury linked to vaping, from more than 450 cases cited last week to the total of 380 cases announced late Thursday.

More Information

HIV Infection May Raise Risk for Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — HIV infection is independently associated with an increased risk for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a research letter published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

EPA to Phase Out Chemical Testing on Mammals

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The eventual elimination of chemical testing on mammals was announced Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The New York Times Article

More Information: EPA

New Tool Measures Patients’ Perceptions of Stroke Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The STROKE Perception Report is a valid and reliable measure of patients’ and family surrogates’ perceptions of the quality of acute stroke hospital services, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing.

Abstract/Full Text

Poverty Rate Drops, but Fewer Americans Have Health Insurance

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The percentage of Americans living in poverty declined in 2018, but the rate of those without health insurance increased, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report.

The New York Times Article

More Information

Studies Look at E-Cigarette Use Linked to Pulmonary Illness

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Electronic cigarette use has been associated with severe pulmonary illness, according to three studies published online Sept. 6 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report and the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text – Schier

Abstract/Full Text – Davidson

Abstract/Full Text – Layden

Editorial

ATS Guideline Outlines Lab Tests for Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Rapid and accurate diagnosis of fungal infections relies on appropriate use of diagnostic testing, according to the official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Racial, Ethnic Underrepresentation Found in Med School Matriculants

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Among medical school matriculants, black, Hispanic, and American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) students are underrepresented, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text

Editorial

Majority of U.S. Doctors Believe ACA Has Improved Access to Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Sixty percent of U.S. physicians believe that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has improved access to care and insurance after five years of implementation, according to a report published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Updated Recommendations, Levels of Care Categorized for Pediatric ICUs

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Three levels of care are recommended for pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients, according to a policy statement published online Sept. 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Exercise Physiologists Aid Early Mobilization in ICU Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Exercise physiologists can provide safe and effective early mobilization in intensive care units (ICUs), according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

Abstract/Full Text

Evidence Says Antipsychotics Do Not Prevent Delirium in Adults

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Current evidence does not support routine use of haloperidol or second-generation antipsychotics for prevention or treatment of delirium in hospitalized adults, according to two reviews published online Sept. 3 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text – Oh

Abstract/Full Text – Nikooie

Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Some Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries Are Unavoidable

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — About 40 percent of hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) are unavoidable, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

Abstract/Full Text

Copyright © 2019 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.