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June 2019 Briefing – Radiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Radiology for June 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Use of 3-D Mammography Rapidly Expanded 2015 to 2017

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Adoption of 3-D mammography expanded rapidly in the United States in just a few years, particularly in areas with greater socioeconomic resources, according to a research letter published online June 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Myocardial Perfusion PET Predicts Cardiac Death in Diabetes

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can improve risk prediction of cardiac death for patients with diabetes, according to a study published online June 27 in Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging.

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USPSTF Lung Cancer Screening Too Conservative for Blacks

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines for lung cancer screening eligibility may be too conservative for African American smokers, according to a study published online June 27 in JAMA Oncology.

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Five-Year Overall Survival for Glioblastoma Persistently Low

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The percentage of patients achieving five-year survival following a glioblastoma diagnosis remains both steady and low, according to a study published online June 19 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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CT Use to Evaluate Suspected Urolithiasis Significantly Increased

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Among patients with suspected urolithiasis presenting to the emergency department (ED), relative use of computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) more than doubled from 2006 to 2014, according to a study published online June 17 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

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MSSP ACOs May Not Improve Spending, Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — After adjustment for the nonrandom exit of clinicians, the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) is not associated with improvements in spending or quality, according to a study published online June 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Combination Biopsy Strategy May Identify More Prostate Cancers

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A lesion visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identifies a heightened risk for clinically significant prostate cancer in men undergoing first-time prostate biopsy, and a combination of targeted and systematic biopsy may improve the chances of detecting cancer, according to a study published online June 12 in JAMA Surgery.

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Physicians Unaware of Breast Density Laws, Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Physicians need more education about breast density and breast cancer screening, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Women’s Health.

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Americans Concerned About Clinician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans are concerned about burnout among their clinicians, according to a survey released June 17 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP).

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Adrenal Incidentalomas Rarely Grow, Change Hormone Function

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Nonfunctioning adrenal tumors (NFATs) or adenomas causing mild autonomous cortisol excess (MACE) rarely show clinically relevant changes in size or hormone function, according to research published online June 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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First States to Expand Medicaid Had Largest Bump in Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The first states to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saw the largest increases in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening from 2012 to 2016, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Most Women Unaware Alcohol Poses Breast Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Women have poor awareness of alcohol’s role in breast cancer risk, according to a study published online June 17 in BMJ Open.

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New England Journal of Medicine Picks New Editor-in-Chief

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The new editor-in-chief of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine is Eric J. Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., who was selected after a worldwide search and plans to start in September, according to the Massachusetts Medical Society, which publishes the journal.

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Health Care Workers With ARIs Often Work While Symptomatic

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Almost all health care workers (HCWs) with acute respiratory illness (ARI) report working at least one day while symptomatic, according to a study published online June 18 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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Computer-Assisted Diagnosis Aids Detection of Glioma Growth

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) can help physicians detect growth of low-grade gliomas, according to a study published online May 28 in PLOS Medicine.

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CV MRI Noninferior to Invasive Angiography + FFR in Stable CAD

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Myocardial-perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is noninferior to invasive angiography and fractional flow reserve (FFR) for guiding coronary revascularization in patients with stable angina and risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to a study published in the June 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Statins May Be Beneficial After Radiation to Thorax, Head, Neck

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For cardiac patients with thorax and head or neck cancer, statin use after radiation therapy is associated with a significant reduction in stroke incidence and a trend toward reduced cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, according to a study published online June 19 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Recommendations Issued for Imaging Use in Multiple Myeloma

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In a review published in the June 1 issue of The Lancet Oncology, recommendations are presented for use of newer imaging techniques for the diagnosis of multiple myeloma.

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USPSTF Addresses Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations on screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) vary with sex, age, smoking status, and family history. These recommendations form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online June 18 by the USPSTF.

Draft Recommendation Statement

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Coronary Artery Calcium Levels in Middle Age Tied to LV Function

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For middle-aged individuals, higher levels of coronary artery calcium (CAC) are associated with higher left ventricular (LV) mass and worse LV function, according to a study published online June 14 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Nilvadipine Increases Cerebral Blood Flow in the Hippocampus

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease, treatment with nilvadipine lowers systolic blood pressure and increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the hippocampus, according to a study published online June 17 in Hypertension.

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Cardiac Radiation Dose in NSCLC Predicts Mortality, Cardiac AEs

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Cardiac radiation dose exposure is a modifiable cardiac risk factor for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study published in the June 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Chemoradiation Does Not Up Survival in Endometrial Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For patients with stage III or IVA endometrial cancer, chemotherapy plus radiation is not associated with improved relapse-free survival versus chemotherapy alone, according to a study published in the June 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Virtual Reality IDs Navigation Issues in Early Alzheimer Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An entorhinal cortex-based virtual reality navigation task can differentiate patients with mild cognitive impairment at low and high risk for developing dementia, according to a study published in the June issue of Brain.

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Access to Health Care Has Little Impact on Longevity

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Health care has modest effects on extending life expectancy in the United States, while behavioral and social determinants may have larger effects, according to a review published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Rapid Cycling Work Roster Improves Resident Sleep Practices

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A rapidly cycling work roster (RCWR) is effective in reducing weekly work hours and the occurrence of >16 consecutive-hour shifts as well as improving sleep duration of resident physicians, according to a study published online May 20 in SLEEP.

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Survey Indicates Physician Misconduct Is Underreported

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Physician misconduct is being underreported and most Americans do not know where to file a complaint, according to a report published by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

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Surveillance Breast MRI Ups Biopsy, Cancer Detection Rates

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Use of surveillance breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with increased biopsy and subsequent cancer detection rates compared with mammography alone among women with a personal history of breast cancer, according to a study published online June 4 in Radiology.

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Carotid Atherosclerosis Predicts CV Events in Psoriatic Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For patients with psoriatic disease (PsD), carotid atherosclerosis, as detected by ultrasound, predicts future incident cardiovascular events (CVEs), according to a study published online June 5 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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AI Model Based on Deep Learning Detects ACL Tears on Knee MRI

TUESDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An artifical intelligence system based on deep learning is feasible for detecting full-thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears within the knee joint on magnetic resonance (MR) images, according to a study published online May 8 in Radiology: Artificial Intelligence.

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ACP Issues Position on Response to Physician Impairment

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Providing assistance for physician impairment and rehabilitation is addressed in a position statement issued by the American College of Physicians and published online June 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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