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June 2019 Briefing – Emergency Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for June 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Infections Tied to Subsequent Risk for Acute Ischemic Stroke

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Different infection types, especially urinary tract infection (UTI), are associated with subsequent acute ischemic stroke, according to a study published online June 27 in Stroke.

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CT Use to Evaluate Suspected Urolithiasis Significantly Increased

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Among patients with suspected urolithiasis presenting to the emergency department (ED), relative use of computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) more than doubled from 2006 to 2014, according to a study published online June 17 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

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MSSP ACOs May Not Improve Spending, Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — After adjustment for the nonrandom exit of clinicians, the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) is not associated with improvements in spending or quality, according to a study published online June 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Americans Concerned About Clinician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans are concerned about burnout among their clinicians, according to a survey released June 17 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP).

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FDA Warns Two Kratom Marketers About False Claims

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday took two kratom marketers to task over false claims that their products can treat or cure opioid addiction.

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Mortality Not Higher With Transfusions From Female Donors

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — There is no increased risk for mortality among patients receiving red blood cell transfusions from female, previously pregnant, or sex-discordant donors, according to a study published in the June 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Smoking Confers Greatest Risk for Major Heart Attack for Women

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Smoking confers a greater increase in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) risk to women than men, according to a study published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Greater Long-Term Decline in Stroke Seen Among Older Adults

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The decline in midlife ischemic strokes over time is less pronounced than the decline among older adults, according to a study published in the June issue of Stroke.

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Anxiety With Type 2 Diabetes Tied to High-Cost Health Care Use

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Anxiety is independently associated with high-cost resource use among individuals with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online June 18 in Diabetes Care.

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New England Journal of Medicine Picks New Editor-in-Chief

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The new editor-in-chief of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine is Eric J. Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., who was selected after a worldwide search and plans to start in September, according to the Massachusetts Medical Society, which publishes the journal.

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2018 to 2019 Influenza Season in U.S. Was Longest in 10 Years

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In the United States, the 2018 to 2019 influenza season was of moderate severity and lasted 21 weeks, according to research published in the June 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Health Care Workers With ARIs Often Work While Symptomatic

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Almost all health care workers (HCWs) with acute respiratory illness (ARI) report working at least one day while symptomatic, according to a study published online June 18 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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Sudden Death Can Occur in Full Spectrum of Epilepsies

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) can occur across the full spectrum of epilepsies, according to a study published online June 19 in Neurology.

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Surgeons’ Unprofessional Behavior Tied to Higher Complication Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Patients whose surgeons have higher numbers of coworker reports about unprofessional behavior may be at increased risk for postsurgical complications, according to a study published online June 19 in JAMA Surgery.

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Outpatient Office Visits Increased With Access to Patient Portal

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — For patients with diabetes, use of a patient portal can increase engagement in outpatient visits, according to a study published online June 19 in PLOS ONE.

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Suicide Rates Peaked for Teens, Young Adults in 2017

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Among adolescents and young adults, suicide rates increased to a high point in 2017, according to a research letter published in the June 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High Temperature Records Will be ‘Smashed’ in Coming Century

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Climate change will cause some regions of the world to “smash” high temperature records every year in the coming century, researchers warn. That will push “ecosystems and communities beyond their ability to cope,” according to the authors of the study published online June 17 in Nature Climate Change.

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Many Young Children Treated in ED for Injuries From Personal Care Products

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A steady and persistent number of personal care product-related injuries were reported for young children from 2002 to 2016, most often occurring among those aged <2 years, according to a study published online June 16 in Clinical Pediatrics.

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Feelings of Powerlessness Tied to Delays in Seeking Care for Acute MI

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Patients’ perceived inability to act is associated with a delay in seeking medical care for acute myocardial infarction, according to a study published online May 27 in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.

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Recommendations Developed to Prepare Children for Camp

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics and published online June 17 in Pediatrics, recommendations are presented for the preparation of children for summer camps.

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Head, Facial Injuries From Motorized Scooters on the Rise

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Facial and head injuries from electric scooter accidents have tripled during the past decade, according to a study published online May 20 in the American Journal of Otolaryngology.

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Opioid-Sparing Strategy Still Provides Good Pain Control

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Following implementation of an opioid-sparing pain management strategy, half of patients report using no opioids and adequate pain control, according to a study published online May 30 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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More Aggressive Statin Tx Needed After Heart Attack in Young Patients

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The majority of young heart attack patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) still have elevated cholesterol levels a year later, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drug, Alcohol, and Suicide Deaths Up Among Millennials

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Drug, alcohol, and suicide deaths have increased among millennials, according to a report issued by the Trust for America’s Health and the Well Being Trust.

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Gabapentinoids Linked to Increased Risk for Significant Adverse Outcomes

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Gabapentinoids are associated with increased risks for adverse outcomes related to coordination disturbances, mental health, and criminality, according to a study published online June 12 in The BMJ.

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Long-Term Opioid Prescribing Up Among Older Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The rates of prolonged opioid prescribing remain high for older cancer survivors five or more years after cancer diagnosis, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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CDC: Wildlife Rabies, Especially in Bats, Poses Risk in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Wildlife rabies, especially in bats, poses a risk to humans in the United States, and postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is important for preventing death, according to research published in the June 12 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Prescription Opioid Use Up Among Binge Drinkers

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Prescription opioid misuse is more common among binge drinkers, with the prevalence of opioid misuse increasing with binge drinking frequency, according to a study published online June 11 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Pertussis Risk Up for Undervaccinated, Unvaccinated Children

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Undervaccinated and unvaccinated children are at increased risk for pertussis, but most cases occur in vaccinated children further away from their last vaccine dose, according to a study published online June 10 in Pediatrics.

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Diagnostic Testing, Antibiotics Overused in Pediatric CAP

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) often receive diagnostic testing and antibiotic therapy despite publication of guidelines against their routine use in 2011, according to a study published online May 20 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

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Targeting Barriers to Self-Care Benefits Seniors With Asthma

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — An intervention designed to address barriers to asthma self-management improves asthma outcomes among older adults, according to a study published online June 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Access to Health Care Has Little Impact on Longevity

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Health care has modest effects on extending life expectancy in the United States, while behavioral and social determinants may have larger effects, according to a review published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Naloxone Available in One in Three Philadelphia Pharmacies

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Only one-third of Philadelphia pharmacies carry naloxone nasal spray and many pharmacies require a physician’s prescription, according to a study published online June 7 in JAMA Network Open.

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Misuse of Alprazolam Common in the United Kingdom

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Nonmedical use of alprazolam is a significant issue in the United Kingdom, particularly among younger adults, according to a study published online June 4 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Rapid Cycling Work Roster Improves Resident Sleep Practices

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — A rapidly cycling work roster (RCWR) is effective in reducing weekly work hours and the occurrence of >16 consecutive-hour shifts as well as improving sleep duration of resident physicians, according to a study published online May 20 in SLEEP.

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Survey Indicates Physician Misconduct Is Underreported

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Physician misconduct is being underreported and most Americans do not know where to file a complaint, according to a report published by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

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App Helps Pediatric Asthma Patients, Parents Self-Monitor

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The electronic-AsthmaTracker (e-AT) app aids self-monitoring and improves asthma outcomes among pediatric patients and their parents, according to a study published in the June issue of Pediatrics.

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Dietary Supplements May Up Risk for Severe Medical Events

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Consumption of dietary supplements, specifically those sold for muscle building, energy, and weight loss, is associated with an increased risk for severe medical events among individuals aged 0 to 25 years, according to a study published online June 5 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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2000 to 2016 Saw Mortality From Falls Increase for Seniors

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — From 2000 to 2016, an increase was observed in mortality from falls for seniors; however, a home-based exercise program can reduce subsequent falls among older adults, according to research published in the June 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Zerbaxa Approved for Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Zerbaxa (ceftolozane and tazobactam) has been approved for a new indication to treat hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) in patients aged 18 years and older, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday.

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Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Rate Up in Sexual-Minority Youth

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) — The prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; i.e., intentional self-harm without wanting to die) is higher among sexual-minority youth than heterosexual youth, according to a research letter published online June 3 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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ACP Issues Position on Response to Physician Impairment

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Providing assistance for physician impairment and rehabilitation is addressed in a position statement issued by the American College of Physicians and published online June 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Number, Rate of Detergent Pod Exposures Modestly Declined

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) — In recent years, the number and rate of liquid laundry detergent packet exposures has declined slightly among children younger than 6 years, according to a study published online June 3 in Pediatrics.

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